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Original Monologues

Currently, we have 393 Original Monologues.
There are 204 Male Monologues.
There are 175 Female Monologues.
There are 14 Male/Female Monologues.

SAMPLES
HAMLET - "To Be, Or Not To Be....."
Tragedy - M - 20 to 49

Author: Shakespeare, William
From: HAMLET

(HAMLET comes onstage. CLAUDIUS, GERTRUDE, POLONIUS,
and OPHELIA have just scattered to various hiding
places nearby, like roaches when the kitchen light
comes on. Hamlet, having laid plots of his own to entrap
the King, appears not to have noticed this and instead
focuses his attention on the audience.
)

To be, or not to be, that is the question:
Whether 'tis nobler in the mind to suffer
The slings and arrows of outrageous fortune;
Or to take arms against a sea of troubles,
And by opposing, end them: to die, to sleep
No more; and by a sleep, to say we end
The heart-ache, and the thousand natural shocks
That flesh is heir to; 'Tis a consumation
Devoutly to be wish'd. To die to sleep,
To sleep, perchance to dream; Aye, there's the rub,
For in that sleep of death, what dreams may come,
When we have shuffled off this mortal coil1
Must give us pause. There's the respect
That makes calamity of so long life:
For who would bear the whips and scorns of time,
The oppressor's wrong, the proud man's contumely,2,3
The pangs of dispriz'd love, the law's delay,4
The insolence of office, and the spurns
That patient merit of the unworthy takes,
When he himself might his quietus make5
With a bare bodkin? Who would these fardles bear6,7
To grunt and sweat under a weary life --
But that the dread of something after death,
The undiscovered country, from whose bourn8
No traveler returns, puzzles the will,
And makes us rather bear those ills we have,
Than fly to others that we know not of.
Thus conscience does make cowards of us all,
And thus the native hue of resolution
Is sicklied o'er with the pale cast of thought,
And enterprises of great pitch and moment,
With this regard their currents turn awry,
And lose the name of action..

Definitions & Notes
1 coil: Turmoil, confusion (mortal coil = troublesome life)
2 oppressor's wrong: Claudius' wrong.
3contumely: Taunts, contemptuous treatment
4dispriz'd : undervalued.
(However, you may notice that in the quarto version,
the word "despiz'd" or 'despised' is used, which also
works well in this context. For me, "dispriz'd"
feels ironic, whereas despised feels more bitter.
Hey, it's your choice which to use. Go for it.
5quietus: A final account, or settlement.
An audit. (Ooh, death and taxes...)
6bodkin: A sharp instrument to make holes with
i.e. as in leather (works good for skin and muscle, too...)
7fardles: (One of my favorite words) A backpack, a bundle.
8bourn: Boundary.

First Folio Version
HAMLET - "To Be, Or Not To Be....."

To be, or not to be, that is the Question:
Whether 'tis Nobler in the minde to suffer
The Slings and Arrowes of outragious Fortune;
Or to take Armes against a Sea of troubles,
And by opposing end them: to dye, to sleepe
No more; and by a sleepe, to say we end
The Heart-ake, and the thousand Naturall shockes
That Flesh is heyre too? 'Tis a consummation
Devoutly to be wish'd. To dye to sleepe,
To sleepe, perchance to Dreame; I, there's the rub,
For in that sleepe of death, what dreames may come,
When we have shuffel'd off this mortall coile,
Must give us pawse. There's the respect
That makes Calamity of so long life:
For who would beare the Whips and Scornes of time,
The Oppressors wrong, the poore mans Contumely,
The pangs of dispriz'd Love, the Lawes delay,
The insolence of Office, and the Spurnes
That patient merit of the unworthy takes,
When he himselfe might his Quietus make
With a bare Bodkin? Who would these fardles beare
To grunt and sweat under a weary life,
But that the dread of something after death,
The undiscovered Countrey, from whose Borne
No Traveller returnes, Puzels the will,
And makes us rather beare those illes we have,
Then flye to others that we know not of.
Thus Conscience does make Cowards of us all,
And thus the Native hew of resolution
Is sicklied o're, with the pale cast of Thought,
And enterprizes of great pith and moment,
With this regard their Currants turne away,
And loose the name of Action.

Shakespeare, William | Internet Rights : www.themonologueshop.com

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